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#601-#700

The 1,000 Greatest Horror Films: #601-#700

The 1,000 Greatest Horror Films: Introduction | #1-#100 | #101-#200 | #201-#300 | #301-#400 | #401-#500 | #501-#600 | #601-#700 | #701-#800 | #801-#900 | #901-#1000 | Full List | Sources | The 21st Century’s Most Acclaimed Horror Films | Top 50 Directors

Thinner

601. (+10) Thinner

Tom Holland

1996 / USA / 93m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Robert John Burke, Joe Mantegna, Lucinda Jenney, Michael Constantine, Kari Wuhrer, Bethany Joy Lenz, Time Winters, Howard Erskine, Terrence Garmey, Randy Jurgensen


“So why… is Thinner simply an entertaining movie and not one of the best King ones? It’s hard to put a finger on but there just seems to be something missing. It might be because side characters aren’t developed quite enough and I found the shift in the last third to be not as effective as what came before it. It also becomes a little hard to root for Billy when he can be a pretty unlikeable lout at times. As is, this is an enjoyable effort and one of the rare gypsy based horror flicks out there – with the best being, of course, Drag Me to Hell. If you’re into King, or want a quickly paced time with stellar effects work, then you should check this out.” – Chris Hartley, The Video Graveyard

Tower of London

602. (+15) Tower of London

Roger Corman

1962 / USA / 79m / Col / Gothic | IMDb
Vincent Price, Michael Pate, Joan Freeman, Robert Brown, Bruce Gordon, Joan Camden, Richard Hale, Sandra Knight, Charles Macaulay, Justice Watson


“As Roger Corman tells it, the filmmakers decided not to fill up the dialogue with Shakespearean prose, instead opting for a more direct approach in order not to alienate the audiences who would go to see a Roger Corman/Vincent Price B-movie (interestingly, a young Francis Ford Coppola worked on the film as dialogue director), and although a black-and-white film version of a Shakespeare play may not sound too appealing to the average cult movie enthusiast, the combination of Vincent Price going stupendously OTT in a role that seems a perfect fit for him and Roger Corman applying his low-budget filmmaking tricks to make the production seem more lavish than it actually is works incredibly well in keeping you glued to the screen to see the villainous King Richard get his comeuppance.” – Amie Cranswick, Flickering Myth

La frusta e il corpo

603. (-13) La frusta e il corpo

Mario Bava

1963 / Italy / 91m / Col / Gothic | IMDb
Daliah Lavi, Christopher Lee, Tony Kendall, Ida Galli, Harriet Medin, Gustavo De Nardo, Luciano Pigozzi, Jacques Herlin


“Widely considered the father of the Italian giallo genre, Mario Bava has influenced the likes of modern-day giallo directors Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, as well as Martin Scorsese, David Lynch, Guillermo del Toro and, most especially, Quentin Tarantino. The Whip and the Body is a gothic horror fantasy that finds Bava at the peak of his visual prowess. Though the giallo genre is often known for its reliance on graphic violence, Bava’s film is noticeably tame. What with its captivating lighting schemes, ghostly death sequences and lurid compositions (passageways are downright vaginal), it’s no wonder that Bava’s fetishistic film has attained cult status.” – Ed Gonzalez, Slant Magazine

À Meia-Noite Levarei Sua Alma

604. (-35) À Meia-Noite Levarei Sua Alma

José Mojica Marins

1964 / Brazil / 84m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
José Mojica Marins, Magda Mei, Nivaldo Lima, Valéria Vasquez, Ilídio Martins Simões, Arildo Iruam, Genésio de Carvalho, Vânia Rangel, Graveto, Robinson Aielo


“Because it is inextricably tethered to a madman, At Midnight I’ll Take Your Soul envisions the world as a skewed and nightmarish place. In terms of production design, Zé’s apartment looks as if were decorated by a mental patient; creepy hand sculptures jettison out from nearly every wall, reaching out as if they were lethal extensions of their owner. The film’s editing style is completely fragmented by insane transitions, including wipes that spin the frame upside down and animated cross-dissolves. Not only is the narrative under Zé’s control, it appears that the filmmaking process has been hijacked by him as well. Taking this into consideration, it’s clear that Marins wants to blur the line between artistic form and character, inhabiting both with the same tenacious verve for the grotesque.” – Glenn Heath Jr., Not Coming To a Theater Near You

The Skull

605. (+7) The Skull

Freddie Francis

1965 / UK / 83m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Peter Cushing, Patrick Wymark, Jill Bennett, Nigel Green, Patrick Magee, Peter Woodthorpe, Michael Gough, George Coulouris, April Olrich, Maurice Good


“Freddie Francis was good at showing off and overstating his camerawork, but in this film his ostentatiousness pays off, making the supernatural segments all the more fevered and disturbing. With little of the expected blood or semi-nudity on display, these inventive sequences of dread invoked by lighting, cinematography, editing and music are the tools The Skull has at its disposal to keep the audience’s attention, and while “subtlety” is certainly the wrong word to use, there is a certain adultness and elegance to evoking unease by such non-sensational means.” – Anton Mistlake, Mistlake’s Blog

Fanatic

606. (+57) Fanatic

Silvio Narizzano

1965 / USA / 97m / Col / Thriller | IMDb
Tallulah Bankhead, Stefanie Powers, Peter Vaughan, Maurice Kaufmann, Yootha Joyce, Donald Sutherland, Gwendolyn Watts, Robert Dorning, Philip Gilbert


“This excellent little horror-thriller was directed by Silvio Narizzano who did a spectacular job at capturing all the little nuances of Bankhead’s performance as well as those around her as she delved into madness. The film would start out on a cheery note but would soon become incredibly moody, atmospheric and packed with as much tension and suspense Narizzano and writer Richard Matheson could muster. As Bankhead’s character lost herself, the anxiety and the uneasiness increased and topped with the horror of her actions, everyone involved from those in production to the actors themselves, made it impossible to turn away from the screen for fear of missing a single minute of it.” – Geoff Rosengren, The Telltale Mind

Die, Monster, Die!

607. (-57) Die, Monster, Die!

Daniel Haller

1965 / USA / 80m / Col / Mystery | IMDb
Boris Karloff, Nick Adams, Freda Jackson, Suzan Farmer, Terence de Marney, Patrick Magee, Paul Farrell, Leslie Dwyer, Harold Goodwin, Sydney Bromley


“American International Pictures’ second attempt at adapting the work of H.P. Lovecraft… A break in filming [Masque of the Red Death] afforded his long-time art director and production designer Daniel Haller a chance to helm AIP’s adaptation of the 1927 Lovecraft tale “The Colour Out Of Space”… the film iself is saved from fading away into total obscurity by a bonkers final third which sees it suddenly transformed into a weird, B-movie crossbreed: part science-fiction, part crazed Gothic melodrama — the producers throw in every successful drive-in movie ingredient there’s ever been, regardless of genre, and mix them all up into one incoherent but enormously satisfying stew!” – Blackgloves, Horrorview.com

Esta Noite Encarnarei no Teu Cadáver

608. (-44) Esta Noite Encarnarei no Teu Cadáver

José Mojica Marins

1967 / Brazil / 108m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
José Mojica Marins, Tina Wohlers, Nadia Freitas, Antonio Fracari, Jose Lobo, Esmeralda Ruchel, Paula Ramos, Tania Mendonça, Arlete Brazolin, Geraldo Bueno


“The film is forcing a wonderful polarization, titillation tinged with terror. The film is unabashedly enticing you with these shots of womanly body parts, and then does its best to disgust be perverting those images with grotesque creatures and the like. Other sequences, such as sex paired with snake attack, provide more of this same dichotomy. But there is more to the visuals than boobs and bile. These shots are well constructed, the lighting is always stark, giving good contrast and keeps the details of the film clear. We are not seeing some shoddily produced horror film, this is a lovingly crafted work.” – Timothy J. Rush, Classic-Horror

The Brotherhood of Satan

609. (0) The Brotherhood of Satan

Bernard McEveety

1971 / UK / 92m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones, Charles Bateman, Ahna Capri, Charles Robinson, Alvy Moore, Helene Winston, Joyce Easton, Debi Storm, Jeff Williams


““TBOS” starts off odd & disquieting with a couple of kids turning toys into real weapons and for a short while you might not understand what the hell is going on but trust me…give the film a little time to work it’s way into your head and you won’t be able to take your eyes off of the screen. McEveety’s direction paints every scene with an ambiance of dread & despair from the first frame on & after you get your bearings that dread jumps off of the screen and into your soul. It’s a seriously unnerving atmosphere that he’s created and it really gets to you after awhile.” – Victor De Leon, Vic’s Movie Den

The Phantom of the Opera

610. (-57) The Phantom of the Opera

Terence Fisher

1962 / UK / 90m / Col / Gothic | IMDb
Herbert Lom, Heather Sears, Edward de Souza, Thorley Walters, Michael Gough, Harold Goodwin, Martin Miller, Liane Aukin, Sonya Cordeau, Marne Maitland


“So why is it worth seeing? A couple of reasons. The main reason is that the Phantom’s backstory is written so divinely that it obscures all other missteps the movie makes. As mentioned previously, you know that this isn’t “just another Phantom.” This is a Phantom with a purpose, and his history is revealed in such a manner that you have to keep your eyes to the screen. It reminds me of watching a standard modern day “twisty” suspense tale. You know upfront who the bad guys and good guys are, but how they GOT there is the whole ride. And in this vein, Phantom doesn’t disappoint. Being intentionally ambiguous as not to ruin the surprise for future viewers, his backstory is one of the most interesting and well thought out of all the Hammer characters, ever.” – Jenn Dlugos, Classic-Horror.com

The Comedy of Terrors

611. (+3) The Comedy of Terrors

Jacques Tourneur

1963 / USA / 84m / Col / Comedy | IMDb
Vincent Price, Peter Lorre, Boris Karloff, Joyce Jameson, Joe E. Brown, Beverly Powers, Basil Rathbone, Alan DeWitt, Buddy Mason, Douglas Williams


“Not bawdy or terribly sophisticated, all told, The Comedy of Terrors derives its charm from its talented cast and crew, its oddly-pleasing, familiar period setting and – I don’t mean this word in the pejorative sense which has crept in during the decades between us and this film – its camp style. It’s light Gothic entertainment through and through, a tale signifying nothing, perhaps, but an opportunity to see some of our best-beloved actors having a damned good time.” – Keri O’Shea, Brutal as Hell

The Oblong Box

612. (-58) The Oblong Box

Gordon Hessler

1969 / UK / 96m / Col / Gothic | IMDb
Vincent Price, Christopher Lee, Rupert Davies, Uta Levka, Sally Geeson, Alister Williamson, Peter Arne, Hilary Heath, Maxwell Shaw, Carl Rigg


“Based on a short Poe story (Wicking re-wrote the original screenplay by Lawrence Huntington), OBLONG eerily delivers a tale of revenge and betrayal… OBLONG confirmed that Hessler could handle period horror. He respectively carried on the Poe series that Corman started a decade earlier, effectively updating the graphic intensity while maintaining a mood that was closer to Hammer than AIP. The impressive sets at Shepperton Studios, along with the beautiful English countryside, enhanced the production.” – George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

Maniac

613. (-16) Maniac

Dwain Esper

1934 / USA / 51m / BW / Exploitation | IMDb
William Woods, Horace B. Carpenter, Ted Edwards, Phyllis Diller, Theo Ramsey, Jenny Dark, Marvelle Andre, Celia McCann, John P. Wade, Marian Constance Blackton


“The early 1930s were an interesting time for filmmaking. Just as pictures were making the transition from silent films to talkies, some of these movies ran over a few road bumps on the path to glory through their broad acting and creaky camera movements. But there were some filmmakers who sought to overshadow these foibles with grand and sensational material. Director Dwain Esper was a talent in the pioneering days of sound films who knew the quickest way to an audience’s heart: mindless and morally objectionable drivel pumped through their popcorn-greased veins… Maniac is an absolute delight for people who have tastes in things socially unacceptable. Time has not taken away one shred of the film’s warped charisma and sleazy delight.” – Jose Cruz, Classic Horror

House of Horrors

614. (+45) House of Horrors

Jean Yarbrough

1946 / USA / 65m / BW / Thriller | IMDb
Rondo Hatton, Robert Lowery, Virginia Grey, Bill Goodwin, Martin Kosleck, Alan Napier, Howard Freeman, Virginia Christine, Joan Shawlee


“A distinctly minor film, but in a bargain-basement way it toys with some interesting themes: the root causes of victimhood, the nature of power, and the price of outsourcing your dirty work to somebody else… Kosleck doesn’t disappoint in this film; as always his soft, accented voice works as a perfect counterpoint to his razor-sharp gaze, which can convey anger or madness — or both. Rondo Hatton doesn’t get top billing either, but this movie was designed as a vehicle for him and his peculiar physiognomy. Hatton suffered from a glandular condition called acromegaly, the symptoms of which weren’t apparent until he was well into adulthood. The condition gradually altered the shape of his head and distorted his body and facial features, giving him a coarse, brutal appearance.” – Michael Popham, The Horror Incorporated Project

Frankenhooker

615. (+46) Frankenhooker

Frank Henenlotter

1990 / USA / 85m / Col / Comedy | IMDb
James Lorinz, Joanne Ritchie, Patty Mullen, J.J. Clark, C.K. Steefel, Shirl Bernheim, Judy Grafe, Helmar Augustus Cooper, Louise Lasser, John Zacherle


“Aside from self-referential skills, Henenlotter has always displayed is a keen knack for pacing and strong script structure and Frankenhooker is a great example of a nicely timed horror/comedy. The film opens with an ultra-hokey death sequence that perfectly captures the spirit of things to come and the events that follow consistently serve to top what came before. Once Jeffrey’s condition is established and his reasoning for experimentation recognized the story sets off into wild, albeit slightly familiar territory but with hardly a dull moment to speak of. Comically, Frankenhooker is right on the mark; a robust creation full of hilarious sight gags and gleefully grotesque scenarios that exhibit a twisted immediacy and joyful exuberance that’s hard to ignore. Henenlotter’s films are generally known for their sleaze and have always possessed a certain low-budget ridiculousness, however it feels like the emphasis this time round was more about evoking laughter than disgust.” – Sam Bowren, A Nightmare on Samityville Street

Der Student von Prag

616. (-13) Der Student von Prag

Henrik Galeen

1926 / Germany / 110m / BW / Drama | IMDb
Conrad Veidt, Elizza La Porta, Fritz Alberti, Agnes Esterhazy, Ferdinand von Alten, Werner Krauss, Erich Kober, Max Maximilian


“Superior [to the 1913] version, thanks to some moody direction by Henrik Galeen (who was involved in either a writing or directorial capacities in an astonishing number of German horror movies, such as both versions of THE GOLEM, WAXWORKS, ALRAUNE and NOSFERATU) and a fine, powerful performance from Conrad Veidt, who may actually have been the finest horror actor of the silents and is here reunited with his CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI co-star Werner Krauss… there’s a real power in the growing horror of the story, and the final sequences in which Veidt is stalked by himself are absolutely chilling. In a sense, there’s no other horror movie out there quite like this one” – Dave Sindelar, Fantastic Movie Musings and Ramblings

It! The Terror from Beyond Space

617. (-13) It! The Terror from Beyond Space

Edward L. Cahn

1958 / USA / 69m / BW / Science Fiction | IMDb
Marshall Thompson, Shirley Patterson, Kim Spalding, Ann Doran, Dabbs Greer, Paul Langton, Robert Bice, Richard Benedict, Richard Hervey, Thom Carney


““IT, The Terror from Beyond” is a fun B picture that only Ed Cahn could have delivered back then. It has cheap scares, a foreboding atmosphere and loads of close calls and action. It is a genuine slice of pulp pie that satisfies and entertains. It has tension that is masterfully provided by Cahn, the story and the actors. It is intelligent and has like-able characters who deliver some quick and sometimes sophomoric dialog that fits the proceedings nicely. The film sports some dated but respectively nice looking special effects and Chan makes good use of shadows which do not let us see IT in it’s entirety for many of the confrontation scenes.” – Victor De Leon, Horror News

I Was a Teenage Frankenstein

618. (+1) I Was a Teenage Frankenstein

Herbert L. Strock

1957 / USA / 74m / BW / Exploitation | IMDb
Whit Bissell, Phyllis Coates, Robert Burton, Gary Conway, George Lynn, John Cliff, Marshall Bradford, Claudia Bryar, Angela Blake, Russ Whiteman


“Like I Was a Teenage Werewolf, I Was a Teenage Frankenstein taps into a metaphor about teenage dissatisfaction. As in Teenage Werewolf, the monster comes to represent alienated adolescence and Whit Bissell is again cast as a calculating and manipulative scientist/authority figure. It is amusing to see that in this film Frankenstein is no longer traditionally a scientist with misguided intentions, he is utterly ruthless from the outset. I Was a Teenage Frankenstein is played considerably more tongue-in-cheek than Teenage Werewolf and emerges as the better of the two films as a result.” – Richard Scheib, Moria – The Science Fiction, Horror and Fantasy Film Review

Revenge of the Creature

619. (-14) Revenge of the Creature

Jack Arnold

1955 / USA / 82m / BW / Science Fiction | IMDb
John Agar, Lori Nelson, John Bromfield, Nestor Paiva, Grandon Rhodes, Dave Willock, Robert Williams, Charles Cane


Revenge of the Creature is surpassed by its predecessor in all but one regard: the Gill-man becomes a clear victim of circumstance and will thus evoke compassion from those of a sensitive inclination. Specifically, the creature is abducted from his natural environment and put on display for exploitative purposes; therefore, the Gill-man’s savagery in the final act occurs within a decidedly justifiable context—much in contrast to Creature from the Black Lagoon, wherein the ethics of invading an animal’s territory and suffering the consequences thereof are presented through an ambiguous perspective.” – Jon Davidson, Midnite Reviews

King of the Zombies

620. (0) King of the Zombies

Jean Yarbrough

1941 / USA / 67m / BW / Zombie | IMDb
Dick Purcell, Joan Woodbury, Mantan Moreland, Henry Victor, John Archer, Patricia Stacey, Guy Usher, Marguerite Whitten, Leigh Whipper, Madame Sul-Te-Wan


“I’m one of the few people that still seems to enjoy traditional voodoo zombie movies – which are few and far between – just as much as recent infected zombie movies. King Of The Zombies (1941) is one such movie, the first zombie-comedy ever made and, even after all these years, it’s still one of the best. It remains… the only zombie movie ever to be nominated for an Oscar, and I’m confident you’ll feel it’s ninety minutes of time well-spent… Directed by prolific filmmaker Jean Yarbrough, King Of The Zombies became a major inspiration for reluctant ghost-chasers from Abbott & Costello to Shaggy & Scooby Doo” – Nigel Honeybone, HorrorNews.net

Weird Woman

621. (new) Weird Woman

Reginald Le Borg

1944 / USA / 63m / BW / Mystery | IMDb
Lon Chaney Jr., Anne Gwynne, Evelyn Ankers, Ralph Morgan, Elisabeth Risdon, Lois Collier, Harry Hayden, Elizabeth Russell, Phil Brown, Kay Harding


“A borderline horror-esque hour of Lon Chaney Jr being harrassed and looking troubled, as all the Inner Sanctum films were. This one was scripted by Brenda Weisberg from the novel Conjure Wife by Fritz Leiber, and if that sounds familiar, well, perhaps you’ve read it, or perhaps you’ve seen the more famous British adaptation called Night of the Eagle from the 1960s. Which is best? Well, the British film probably, but that’s not to say the American version is without interest. It does tend to eschew the supernatural explanation after spending almost all of the running time relying on it for thrills, but is fairly enjoyable nonetheless.” – Graeme Clark, The Spinning Image

Dr. Cyclops

622. (+2) Dr. Cyclops

Ernest B. Schoedsack

1940 / USA / 77m / BW / Science Fiction | IMDb
Albert Dekker, Thomas Coley, Janice Logan, Charles Halton, Victor Kilian, Frank Yaconelli, Paul Fix, Frank Reicher


“[Director] Schoedsack, endowed as he was with a great eye and a knack for special effects was – to put it mildly – one hell of a photographer and filmmaker. His work in this picture laid the visual groundwork (as Kong most certainly did) for generations of films and filmmakers to follow… “Dr. Cyclops” is not the masterpiece that “King Kong” was, but in its own special way, it was definitely ahead of its time in terms of both special effects and political/historical considerations and it amply provides solid entertainment to anyone who loves genre pictures. The picture’s exploration of a “foreign” enemy wanting to experiment upon and ultimately subjugate American interests also pre-dates that attitudes so prevalent over one decade later during the sci-fi pictures made during the Cold War.” – Greg Klymkiw, Daily Film Dose

Before I Hang

623. (-21) Before I Hang

Nick Grinde

1940 / USA / 62m / BW / Science Fiction | IMDb
Boris Karloff, Evelyn Keyes, Bruce Bennett, Edward Van Sloan, Ben Taggart, Pedro de Cordoba, Wright Kramer, Bertram Marburgh, Don Beddoe, Robert Fiske


“The mechanical zest with which Director Nick Grinde usually manages to obscure script deficencies in films of this genre is conspicuously absent in “Before I Die.” But if you’re taken in by reels and reels of test tubes, mechanical hearts and other scientific gadgets, or the brooding atmosphere provoked through the use of murky photography, then “Before I Hang” should prove to be moderately entertaining. It’s strictly a one-man show—Mr. Karloff’s as far as performances go, but Pedro de Cordoba manages to get, off a pretty good imitation of a piano maestro.” – Bosley Crowther, The New York Times

Count Yorga, Vampire

624. (-6) Count Yorga, Vampire

Bob Kelljan

1970 / USA / 93m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Robert Quarry, Roger Perry, Michael Murphy, Michael Macready, Donna Anders, Judy Lang, Edward Walsh, Julie Conners, Paul Hansen, Sybil Scotford


“Count Yorga – Vampire (originally conceived as a soft-core porn film entitled The Loves of Count Iorga) is a nifty little low-budget exploitation effort that uses its resources to good effect. The shocks are crude but effective. Although relatively tame by later standards, the gore has a nasty edge to it, underlining the film’s cynical sensibility and downbeat ending… [it] survives on the strength of its title performance and on the inventiveness of its approach to modern day vampirism. Yorga may not be a very refined film, but it packs a lot of attitude, and there’s no denying that the surprise ending is like a wicked little punch in the face.” – Steve Biodrowski, Cinefantastique

The Evil of Frankenstein

625. (-12) The Evil of Frankenstein

Freddie Francis

1964 / UK / 84m / Col / Gothic | IMDb
Peter Cushing, Peter Woodthorpe, Duncan Lamont, Kiwi Kingston, Sandor Elès, Katy Wild, David Hutcheson, James Maxwell, Howard Goorney, Anthony Blackshaw


“The Evil of Frankenstein did everything right by Hammer horror standards. It benefits from a subtly creepy atmosphere woven through the entire film, which is aided by some impressive advancements in set design (Frakenstein’s laboratory is most impressive). Peter Cushing has another spell-binding performance as Dr. Frankenstein under his belt. I love his version of the Doctor more and more with every performance as he brings in a new aspect of his personality. In The Evil of Frankenstein he brought a hint of paternal vulnerability to the role as he desperately tries to fix his reanimated corpse “son.” To round out the enjoyment, we’re treated to the Hammer music score we all have come to love and a climax that will take your breath away.” – Jenn Dlugos, Classic-Horror.com

The Mummy's Tomb

626. (new) The Mummy’s Tomb

Harold Young

1942 / USA / 61m / BW / Supernatural | IMDb
Dick Foran, John Hubbard, Elyse Knox, George Zucco, Turhan Bey, Wallace Ford, Virginia Brissac, Cliff Clark, Mary Gordon, Paul E. Burns


“Despite an unnecessary eight-minute recap of the preceding film, I found this sequel entertaining thanks to an exciting, fiery climax and the atmospheric shots of Kharis trudging alongside white picket fences and across lonely nighttime landscapes. Alas, the blaze at the end of The Mummy’s Hand has left Kharis with a blind eye to go along with his pronounced limp and bad left arm. He moves so slowly that it’s hard to fathom why his victims just don’t run away. On the plus side, Elyse Knox—who became Mark Harmon’s mother—makes a fetching heroine. It’s easy to see why Turhan Bey’s character puts Kharis on the back-burner and shifts his interest to her. The aforementioned climax, featuring a posse with torches setting fire to the Bannings’ mansion, oddly recalls the ending of 1931’s Frankenstein.” – R.B. Armstrong, Classic Film & TV Café

The Brain That Wouldn't Die

627. (-12) The Brain That Wouldn’t Die

Joseph Green

1962 / USA / 82m / Col / Science Fiction | IMDb
Jason Evers, Virginia Leith, Anthony La Penna, Adele Lamont, Bonnie Sharie, Paula Maurice, Marilyn Hanold, Bruce Brighton, Arny Freeman, Fred Martin


“Under-funded, under-directed and dripping with some of the earliest outright gore scenes, The Brain that Wouldn’t Die is a wonderful mess. It has perhaps the worst-filmed accident ever in a movie and is padded with trashy strip acts and catfights that apparently were retained in the general release for the kiddie matinee market. But artistic poverty is totally beside the point. Enjoyable precisely for its utter lack of taste, the film features three great – no, awful – no, great camp performances.” – Glenn Erickson, DVDTalk

Devil Doll

628. (-12) Devil Doll

Lindsay Shonteff

1964 / UK / 81m / BW / Evil Doll | IMDb
Bryant Haliday, William Sylvester, Yvonne Romain, Sandra Dorne, Nora Nicholson, Alan Gifford, Karel Stepanek, Francis De Wolff


“Devil Doll may not be a work of dazzling brilliance, but it’s got enough going for it to earn my commendation nonetheless. I like the fact that the living dummy isn’t really the monster here, and I think Bryant Haliday’s performance as Vorelli is a minor gem of celluloid villainy. He’s so shamelessly slimy, acting as though he hasn’t a single give-a-fuck to spare for the possibility that anyone might find him out and oppose him. You get the feeling this arrogant bastard reckons himself so much smarter than everyone else around him that there isn’t even a point to pretending not to be evil. It’s a great way to get around the potential problem of a script that never once depicts Vorelli as doing anything to cover his tracks outside of engineering an alibi for the hour of Magda’s murder; he just goes ahead and does whatever he wants, relying on the seeming impossibility of his deeds to protect him from any negative consequences that might ordinarily follow from them.” – Scott Ashlin, 1000 Misspent Hours

The Dark Eyes of London

629. (-74) The Dark Eyes of London

Walter Summers

1939 / UK / 76m / BW / Thriller | IMDb
Bela Lugosi, Hugh Williams, Greta Gynt, Edmon Ryan, Wilfred Walter, Alexander Field


“Up to now, the most popular screen grotesqueries have had a certain lightness of touch; when Quasimodo, for instance, was beaten by knouts in the cathedral square, the camera mercifully averted its lens, or gave the streaming blood the merest glance, purely for verificative purposes. Not so “The Human Monster,” in which not only is Wilfred Walter more unglamorous than even Charles Laughton as the hunchback, but is totally blind in the bargain. Consequently, his homicidal technique is the more deliberative and, so to speak, stately, giving the camera plenty of time to dwell with sadistic relish on the more recherché details of his method of doing his victims in.” – B. R. Crisler, The New York Times

Firestarter

630. (+16) Firestarter

Mark L. Lester

1984 / USA / 114m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
David Keith, Drew Barrymore, Freddie Jones, Heather Locklear, Martin Sheen, George C. Scott, Art Carney, Louise Fletcher, Moses Gunn, Antonio Fargas


“As with Carrie there is a deeper tragedy revealing itself here, the inability for these characters to even find a little solace in the only thing we all possess, namely ourselves. The startling pyrotechnic jamboree at the movies close is one of the more impressive pre-Jurassic Park visual effects feats. There is something bewitching and horrifying about seeing a small child walk through bullets and wreckage, whilst everything else around her burns to the ground. The great eighties electronica outfit Tangerine Dream provide yet another fantastically atmospheric soundtrack that helps to paint over some of the more drably realised visuals, whilst heightening the impact of this impressive ending.” – Apercu

The Invisible Man Returns

631. (-10) The Invisible Man Returns

Joe May

1940 / USA / 81m / Col / Science Fiction | IMDb
Cedric Hardwicke, Vincent Price, Nan Grey, John Sutton, Cecil Kellaway, Alan Napier, Forrester Harvey


“Though the franchise would soon take a turn for the ludicrous with a female-led comedic riff on the original H.G. Wells story (as well as a propaganda piece that sicced a see-through fellow on the Nazis), this film retains the seriousness of its predecessor while carving out its own identity. In fact, one could argue that The Invisible Man Returns is even more of a heartbreaker, as we come to see a good man’s gradual transformation into a monster rather than know him just as a maniac from the start…. Though more sentimental and less shocking than its predecessor, The Invisible Man Returns can confidently call itself a worthy sequel.” – A.J. Hakari, CineSlice

The Queen of Spades

632. (-74) The Queen of Spades

Thorold Dickinson

1949 / UK / 95m / BW / Gothic | IMDb
Anton Walbrook, Edith Evans, Yvonne Mitchell, Ronald Howard, Mary Jerrold, Anthony Dawson, Miles Malleson, Michael Medwin, Athene Seyler, Ivor Barnard


“Between the pair of them, and with Dickinson’s drive to exacerbate the melodramatic, feverish atmosphere, they make a virtue out of the small budget and limited sets, using mirrors, shadows, candelabra, religious icons and period paraphernalia to encrust the Countess’s palace and its myriad doorways, passages and rooms. The Countess’s boudoir and the ornate Russian church used in the heartstopping funeral sequence of the film are brilliant examples of their craft and they emphasise the film’s squeezing in and expansion of space, from claustrophobia to agoraphobia.”- Frank Collins, Cathode Ray Tube

All That Money Can Buy

633. (-74) All That Money Can Buy

William Dieterle

1941 / USA / 107m / BW / Drama | IMDb
Edward Arnold, Walter Huston, Jane Darwell, Simone Simon, Gene Lockhart, John Qualen, H.B. Warner, Frank Conlan, Lindy Wade, George Cleveland


“Walter Huston’s performance as the charming, urbane, and supremely self-confident Mr. Scratch is the key to the film; he doesn’t get much screen time, and has even less dialogue, but he’s hands down the most memorable character in the film… If it weren’t for Huston’s performance, The Devil and Daniel Webster would be relegated to lecture halls where film students would dutifully catalogue its expressionist elements and cultural history classes would write tedious papers about its critique of the American banking system. Huston steals the show with a performance more imp-like in it’s physicality than devilish or evil” – Sarah Boslaugh, PopMatters

Man Made Monster

634. (new) Man Made Monster

George Waggner

1941 / USA / 59m / BW / Science Fiction | IMDb
Lionel Atwill, Lon Chaney Jr., Anne Nagel, Frank Albertson, Samuel S. Hinds, William B. Davidson, Ben Taggart, Constance Bergen, Ivan Miller, Chester Gan


“Man Made Monster was one of two collaborations between Lon Chaney, Jr. and director/writer (and sometime producer) George Waggner to reach theaters during 1941 — the other was The Wolf Man, and together the two movies revealed a winning combination. Where most directors would be hampered by Chaney’s limited acting range, Waggner manages to play to the star’s greatest strength — his earnestness — and effectively glossed over his limitations, and evoked audience sympathy for the actor and the character that he plays. That’s essential in a film as fast-paced as this one, and it’s one of the major reasons why Man Made Monster has endured in popularity across the decades” – Bruce Eder, AllMovie

The Man Who Changed His Mind

635. (-9) The Man Who Changed His Mind

Robert Stevenson

1936 / UK / 66m / BW / Science Fiction | IMDb
Boris Karloff, John Loder, Anna Lee, Frank Cellier, Donald Calthrop, Cecil Parker, Lyn Harding


““The Man Who Changed His Mind” is perhaps one of the most intense horror films from the 1930s that I’ve come across. From the first time Boris Karloff’s chain-smoking mad scientist crosses paths with Anna Lee’s brilliant and independent-minded surgeon, you know things are going to end badly for more than one of the film’s characters. But even with that knowledge, you’re not going to guess how badly and for whom until the story is all but done unfolding. Even after nearly 75 years, this is a horror film that countless modern-day filmmakers need to study and emulate’ their films would be far better for it.” – Steve Miller, Shades of Gray

El día de la bestia

636. (-95) El día de la bestia

Álex de la Iglesia

1995 / Spain / 103m / Col / Black Comedy | IMDb
Álex Angulo, Armando De Razza, Santiago Segura, Terele Pávez, Nathalie Seseña, Maria Grazia Cucinotta, Gianni Ippoliti, Jaime Blanch, David Pinilla, Antonio Dechent


“The Day of the Beast (El Día de la Bestia) was Álex de la Iglesia’s second feature film and effectively launched his career on the international stage. In keeping with the form of Spanish humour known as esperpento – in which a distorted version of reality is utilised in order to critique it – the film contains grotesque violence and slapstick humour in a nonetheless affectionate take on the horror genre… the film benefits from characters who are written and performed with warmth and humour. At the centre, Angulo – who sadly died earlier this year – was never better than as the plucky and determined little priest, ready to do battle with the forces of evil on the streets of Madrid, and he’s ably supported by the rest of the cast.” – Rebecca Naughten, Eye For Film

Invaders from Mars

637. (-70) Invaders from Mars

William Cameron Menzies

1953 / USA / 78m / BW / Science Fiction | IMDb
Helena Carter, Arthur Franz, Jimmy Hunt, Leif Erickson, Hillary Brooke, Morris Ankrum, Max Wagner, William Phipps, Milburn Stone, Janine Perreau


“The popularity of the film can likely be accounted for by the (mostly) straightforward simplicity of the plot, but Invaders from Mars isn’t merely a pleasant pushover. Fairly original in its use of a child as the primary character in an adult world, the film successfully taps into the heightened fear we tend to experience in youth, with the inflating paranoia of the 1950s acting as something of an added pressure cooker. The use of vivid colors is fittingly surreal, while the large-scale presence of the invaders is grounded by distinctly personal loss, guaranteeing the ensuing nightmares of many a pre-adolescent for years to come.” – Rob Humanick, Suite101

I Bury the Living

638. (-68) I Bury the Living

Albert Band

1958 / USA / 77m / BW / Thriller | IMDb
Richard Boone, Theodore Bikel, Peggy Maurer, Howard Smith, Herbert Anderson, Robert Osterloh


“I Bury the Living is an inexpensive, stark picture, but it succeeds through its dark style and its unbending, relentless pursuit of the oddly imaginative, yet simple premise. The entire action of the movie takes place in only a few rooms and in a small portion of the cemetery. This combined with the fact that the majority of the scenes of tension take place in the small, dingy caretaker’s office intensify the picture’s claustrophobic, paranoid, almost surreal edge.” – Josh Hickman, Film Threat

The Omega Man

639. (-16) The Omega Man

Boris Sagal

1971 / USA / 98m / Col / Post-Apocalyptic | IMDb
Charlton Heston, Anthony Zerbe, Rosalind Cash, Paul Koslo, Eric Laneuville, Lincoln Kilpatrick, Jill Giraldi, Anna Aries, Brian Tochi, DeVeren Bookwalter


“What “The Omega Man” lacks in serious and heavy handed tone is made up with very groovy and stylish action, suspense and even some character driven frivolity. In other words it’s a deep down 1970’s, balls to the wall, sci-fi cult classic. First there is a lot to love with Heston here, playing up the machismo at times, he conveys capably that he is alone, barely sane and desperate. He is just bad ass from frame one till the very closing of the movie.” – Victor De Leon, Horror News

Hardware

640. (+53) Hardware

Richard Stanley

1990 / UK / 94m / Col / Cyberpunk | IMDb
Carl McCoy, Iggy Pop, Dylan McDermott, John Lynch, Mark Northover, Stacey Travis, Paul McKenzie, Lemmy, William Hootkins, Mac McDonald


“With its post apocalyptic setting, robot gone mad, extreme gore and a cast that includes Iggy Pop – well, his voice, anyway – and Lemmy from Motorhead, it is easy to consider Richard Stanley’s Hardware to be essentially a lower budget, more intentionally punk take on The Terminator. This is essentially correct, though Stanley’s film would be a Terminator set in a world where the humans are hell-bent on destroying themselves and their planet while the robotic killing machines are just on the verge of turning on their creators and supposed masters… Though the body count is low there are several truly gruesome moments pulled of with an undeniable, and undeniably revolting, sense of style.” – Todd Brown, Twitch

Long Weekend

641. (+37) Long Weekend

Colin Eggleston

1978 / Australia / 97m / Col / Nature | IMDb
John Hargreaves, Briony Behets, Mike McEwen, Roy Day, Michael Aitkens, Sue Kiss von Soly


“Under Eggleston’s moody direction, even the most minute of sounds is over-amplified to explosive volume and the voyeuristic camerawork tends to be from the ground up, as though from the point-of-view of lurking critters – so that the wilderness locations, for all their natural beauty, seem to brim with the tension of unbearable foreboding. Neither Hargreaves, nor Behets, shrink from the narcissistic unpleasantness of their characters, in what are bravely unflattering performances. Best of all is the ending, which, though shockingly abrupt, is, within the film’s elaborate nexus of motifs, totally, perfectly right, only to be topped by a final, fern-laden image that is haunting enough to do Andrei Tarkovsky proud.” – Anton Bitel, Eye For Film

The Cat and the Canary

642. (-51) The Cat and the Canary

Elliott Nugent

1939 / USA / 72m / BW / Comedy | IMDb
Bob Hope, Paulette Goddard, John Beal, Douglass Montgomery, Gale Sondergaard, Elizabeth Patterson, George Zucco, Nydia Westman, John Wray, George Regas


“This adaptation of John Willard’s 1922 play is notable for providing Bob Hope his starring debut, and for offering Paulette Goddard a chance to show off her sadly under-utilized comedic chops. The film’s “let’s scare the heroine to death” storyline — while imitated ad nauseum by countless later “old dark house” horror flicks — remains solidly suspenseful; you’re guaranteed to be kept in the dark (literally) about the identity of the killer. Director Elliott Nugent and cinematographer Charles Lang do a fine job keeping the proceedings appropriately spooky and atmospheric, though with Hope on board, there’s naturally plenty of corny levity (“Let’s all drink scotch and make wry faces.”).” – FilmFanatic

Le notti del terrore

643. (+21) Le notti del terrore

Andrea Bianchi

1981 / Italy / 85m / Col / Zombie | IMDb
Karin Well, Gianluigi Chirizzi, Simone Mattioli, Antonella Antinori, Roberto Caporali, Peter Bark, Claudio Zucchet, Anna Valente, Raimondo Barbieri, Mariangela Giordano


“Sure, the plot is paper (or should I say slasher) thin, but the direction is competently done. It’s not as artistic or well done as a Fulci film, but there’s a very guerilla, hand-held style that captures the mayhem effectively. Veterans of Italian cinema will notice a lot of other staples here, like the use of long, drawn-out takes, dramatic zooms, and weird voice dubbing. If you’re not use to Italian horror, the dubbing will throw you off at first, but believe me, this film doesn’t come close to offering the weirdest in that respect (anyone that remembers Bob from House by the Cemetery can attest to that). Once you get used to it, however, it really becomes part of the charm. You also get some signature, upbeat music that’s almost a staple of these Italian films; the horror music cues, however, sound like 60s stock music that further contributes to the bizarre Night of the Living Dead vibe.” – Brett Gallman, Oh, The Horror

The Maze

644. (new) The Maze

William Cameron Menzies

1953 / USA / 80m / BW / Gothic | IMDb
Richard Carlson, Veronica Hurst, Katherine Emery, Michael Pate, John Dodsworth, Hillary Brooke, Stanley Fraser, Lilian Bond, Owen McGiveney, Robin Hughes


“Like many of the films from the golden age of 3-D, The Maze doesn’t rely on its 3-D effects to tell its story. In fact, it’s just as effective of a story when watched in two dimensions as it is in three. The Maze was directed by William Cameron Menzies (whose claim to fame was his stunning use of color as the production designer for Gone with the Wind, but he also directed the legendary Invaders from Mars), and his use of the technology is more textural and layering than gimmicky… The castle is a perfect setting for a horror film, with its long hallways, arching doorways and sweeping staircases, and the environment only adds to the excitement.” – James Jay Edwards, FilmFracture

Shock Waves

645. (-14) Shock Waves

Ken Wiederhorn

1977 / USA / 85m / Col / Zombie | IMDb
Peter Cushing, Brooke Adams, Fred Buch, Jack Davidson, Luke Halpin, D.J. Sidney, John Carradine, Don Stout, Clarence Thomas, Sammy Graham


“Director Wiederhorn allows his camera to act almost voyeuristic as it creeps through the trees to spy on the zombies that pop up from the murky water. They are presented as paranormal specters that are silhouetted by the blinding sun reflecting off the water. At times, we see them from an extreme distance, marching in formation and turning to barely acknowledge their gaunt commander as he pleads with them to stop their meaningless slaughter. It was these scenes that made me fall in love with Shock Waves, the film just subtle enough while every once in a while, getting right in our faces so we can see its soggy decay. We never see any scenes of mass carnage, the zombies preferring to drown their victims instead of gnawing at their flesh and sucking on their entrails. That fact that the film remains eerily tranquil throughout, never getting frantic or hurrying is what really makes this film such an effective little adventure.” – Steve Habrat, Anti-Film School

Messiah of Evil

646. (+211) Messiah of Evil

Willard Huyck & Gloria Katz

1973 / USA / 90m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Michael Greer, Marianna Hill, Joy Bang, Anitra Ford, Royal Dano, Elisha Cook Jr., Charles Dierkop, Bennie Robinson, Morgan Fisher, Emma Truckman


““Messiah of Evil” is the kind of movie that’s made from its flaws as much as its strengths. The incoherence of the screenplay is actually a prime example of great horror storytelling. On the surface, it pretends to explain all, but the “explanation” only succeeds in raising more questions. A great horror film leaves giant holes in the screen for us to project our own fears and does not reassure us in the end that all is well. At its most basic level, a good horror story is about uncertainty, and “Messiah of Evil” is one of the most uncertain movies ever made.” – Brian Holcomb, Beyond Hollywood

Ghost Story

647. (-22) Ghost Story

John Irvin

1981 / USA / 110m / Col / Haunted House | IMDb
Fred Astaire, Melvyn Douglas, Douglas Fairbanks Jr., John Houseman, Craig Wasson, Patricia Neal, Alice Krige, Jacqueline Brookes, Miguel Fernandes, Lance Holcomb


“Ghost Story plays its horror cards in all suits, from classical atmospheric chills (and as a note to Irvin’s love for detail, watch how the wind doesn’t begin to blow in the graveyard until Houseman says, “And the wind began to blow”) to Dick Smith’s excellent zombie make-up. It’s not gory, really, but some scenes, such as a body falling from a high-rise, shattering through a glass roof, and landing with a thud next to a pool, are more brutal than usual–Irvin graphically captures the tragedy and weight of the fall in a way that splattered body parts simply couldn’t do. The film’s real strength, though, lies in its ability to create ghostly thrills via deep characters who have a reason to be scared. And that, combined with all the other unique, superb elements, make this a must see for any genre fans or any serious fan of film.” – Brandt Sponseller, Classic-Horror

Vamp

648. (+6) Vamp

Richard Wenk

1986 / USA / 93m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Chris Makepeace, Sandy Baron, Robert Rusler, Dedee Pfeiffer, Gedde Watanabe, Grace Jones, Billy Drago, Brad Logan, Lisa Lyon, Jim Boyle


“[T]he make up effects are fantastic with Grace Jones taking on the form of clawed monster with grotesque results, while every vampire has their own distinct personality and form allowing them individual bouts of horror with every lunge at our characters. Sandy Baron is a considerably excellent reluctant hero who becomes a vampire hunter as the film progresses, learning to survive among the rats in the sewers who desperately want to kill him to save their goddess Katrina. “Vamp” is a wonderful trip down memory lane and a horror comedy that still holds up to this day with vampires who were actually horrifying at one point in time.” – Felix Vasquez Jr., Cinema Crazed

The Town That Dreaded Sundown

649. (-14) The Town That Dreaded Sundown

Charles B. Pierce

1976 / USA / 90m / Col / Crime | IMDb
Ben Johnson, Andrew Prine, Dawn Wells, Jimmy Clem, Jim Citty, Charles B. Pierce, Robert Aquino, Cindy Butler, Christine Ellsworth, Earl E. Smith


“By the conclusion of “The Town That Dreaded Sundown”, a brief confrontation between the authorities and the killer occurs, but nothing comes of it, the “Phantom” mysteriously vanishing afterwards as if into thin air. In the closing moments, the viewer is left to ponder not only the whereabouts of the culprit, but the effect that such inconceivable crimes can have on a community. “The Town That Dreaded Sundown” leaves one with such striking moments of stark, raw terror that it puts many less serious horror films to shame. After all, these crimes actually happened, and just the thought of that is petrifying.” – Dustin Putnam, The Movie Boy

Scars of Dracula

650. (+18) Scars of Dracula

Roy Ward Baker

1970 / UK / 96m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Christopher Lee, Dennis Waterman, Jenny Hanley, Christopher Matthews, Patrick Troughton, Michael Gwynn, Michael Ripper, Wendy Hamilton, Anouska Hempel


“The movie can drive a horror fan nuts. The script by “John Elder” (Hammer exec Anthony Hinds) is awkward and routine, annoyingly different from the previous Hammer Draculas, but very like lots of other horror movies. Unlike the previous entries in the series, there’s very little continuity between ‘Scars’ and its predecessor… The movie is frustrating because so much of it is so routine, and some of it looks so cheap – while more attention is paid to the character, the personality, of Dracula than in ANY of the previous Hammer outings… But despite this, and the generally high level of acting one expects from Hammer, the movie cannot evade a second-string, hangdog aura.” – Bill Warren, Audio Video Revolution

Rear Window

651. (+14) Rear Window

Alfred Hitchcock

1954 / USA / 112m / Col / Thriller | IMDb
James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, Thelma Ritter, Raymond Burr, Judith Evelyn, Ross Bagdasarian, Georgine Darcy, Sara Berner, Frank Cady


“It’s one of Alfred Hitchcock’s inspired audience-participation films: watching it, you feel titillated, horrified, and, ultimately, purged. The story is set mainly in a Greenwich Village apartment with a view into the rooms across the courtyard, but in Hitchcock’s hands this small space contains multitudes. Here, he pushed the subjective-camera technique—putting the audience into the minds of his characters—to new heights… It’s an astonishing visual and psychological coup. Hitchcock’s brilliant satire of cramped city life and his masterly evocation of urban voyeurism suddenly generate primal fear and profound insight.” – Michael Sragow, New Yorker

The Fall of the House of Usher

652. (+241) The Fall of the House of Usher

James Sibley Watson & Melville Webber

1928 / USA / 13m / BW / Surrealism | IMDb
Herbert Stern, Hildegarde Watson, Melville Webber


“What was theoretical in Epstein’s The Three-Sided Mirror is here freer, more lucid and ethereal, and from its first image of a visitor with busy fingers wading through a tangle of trees and branches to the final orgy of poetic destruction, the director intensely considers the push-pull relationship between life and art—the precarious soul-suck between the two and the chaos their battle risks. When Debucourt’s Usher looks at his painting, he is both staring at the visage of his elusive wife’s representation and the audience itself. Epstein treats celluloid not unlike Usher’s canvas—a delicate, fragile thing to draw on (slow or fast, sometimes twice, thrice, four times over)—and to look at the screen of this film is to witness a portal into a complex, heretofore unknown dimension of cinematic representation.” – Ed Gonzalez, Slant Magazine

The Satanic Rites of Dracula

653. (+47) The Satanic Rites of Dracula

Alan Gibson

1973 / UK / 87m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Christopher Lee, Peter Cushing, Michael Coles, William Franklyn, Freddie Jones, Joanna Lumley, Richard Vernon, Barbara Yu Ling, Patrick Barr, Richard Mathews


“Director Alan Gibson ignores the psychedelic kitsch that he gave Dracula 1972 AD, instead giving this film a gritty and sombre outlook whilst maintaining the films modern day setting. The plot, involving Dracula spreading the black-death throughout the world to destroy the human race, is the stuff of James Bond films. In fact the whole film plays more like a Sixties spy movie than a horror film… Strangely enough Dracula didn’t really need to be in the film as the rest of the cast provide enough scares and excitement to make the film work; it’s almost as if Hammer already had a storyline and then added in Dracula at the last minute. Saying that it’s all great fun, providing your tongue is firmly in your cheek and you don’t hold the earlier Hammer Dracula films in to high a reverence.” – David Michael Brown, Digital Retribution

Temnye vody

654. (+17) Temnye vody

Mariano Baino

1993 / Russia / 94m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Louise Salter, Venera Simmons, Mariya Kapnist, Lubov Snegur, Alvina Skarga, Valeriy Bassel, Pavel Sokolov, Anna Rose Phipps, Tanya Dobrovolskaya, Valeriy Kopaev


“That was weird. Those were the first words that spilled out of my mouth as the end credits rolled on Dark Waters, a British/Italian/Russian co-production filmed in post-Soviet Ukraine. Directed and co-written by Mariano Baino, Dark Waters is a singular experience. Steeped in Lovecraftian influence, the film can be dizzying, even maddening, to watch. However, with the captivating direction and surprisingly engaging story, Dark Waters may actually be worth your time. It is not, however, a film for the feeble-minded… in order to enjoy it, it really needs to be taken as a whole – the dizzying story embraced and experienced. If you’re willing to enter that kind of mindset, that kind of half-fantasy world, Dark Waters has the potential to be understood not only as a creepy religious horror, but as a fine addition to Lovecraftian filmmaking.” – Julia Merriam, Classic-Horror.com

Bride of Chucky

655. (+48) Bride of Chucky

Ronny Yu

1998 / USA / 89m / Col / Evil Doll | IMDb
Jennifer Tilly, Brad Dourif, Katherine Heigl, Nick Stabile, Alexis Arquette, Gordon Michael Woolvett, John Ritter, Lawrence Dane, Michael Louis Johnson


“After the squalor that was Child’s Play 3, Mancini and newly anointed director Ronny Yu (who would later helm Freddy vs. Jason) resuscitated the series with Bride of Chucky, a new breed of killer doll movie that dropped any pretense of horror and went running toward comedy and satire. Some hail it as hilarious; others find it more intolerable than Child’s Play 3. And frankly, this is about as much of a to each his own series shift as you might imagine… Tilly is a godsend (although some detractors have deemed her, not Child’s Play 3, the real series killer), Dourif is a blast, and the lunacy of it all piles up and piles up until it literally spills into the unholy union of Chucky and Tiffany, announcing Mancini’s willingness to take the franchise anywhere.” – Kenneth Brown, Blu-ray.com

Tesis

656. (+27) Tesis

Alejandro Amenábar

1996 / Spain / 125m / Col / Thriller | IMDb
Ana Torrent, Fele Martínez, Eduardo Noriega, Xabier Elorriaga, Miguel Picazo, Nieves Herranz, Rosa Campillo, Paco Hernández, Rosa Ávila, Teresa Castanedo


“In spite of its subject matter, Tesis is not a gore film. At a number of points throughout the film, it appears that Amenabar is about to show the audience some particularly grisly sight, only for the camera to pull away just at the last moment; Amenabar, instead, preferring to focus on Angela’s reaction to what she is seeing. Angela insists that she is only interested in violent movies from a purely academic standpoint and that she considers what she is seeing to be disgusting, yet she is every bit as fascinated by it as Chema. In Tesis, Angela serves as a proxy for the viewer. Anyone who wants to watch a film like this to begin with, must have a certain desire to see violent imagery and in the final scene, Amenabar takes his audience to task for having such a desire.” – Genevieve Hayes, Murder and Angst

Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight

657. (-77) Tales from the Crypt: Demon Knight

Ernest R. Dickerson

1995 / USA / 92m / Col / Black Comedy | IMDb
John Kassir, Billy Zane, William Sadler, Jada Pinkett Smith, Brenda Bakke, CCH Pounder, Dick Miller, Thomas Haden Church, John Schuck, Gary Farmer


“Take equal parts Night of the Living Dead and Aliens. Mix thoroughly with generous doses of sick humour and state-of-the-art gore. Toss in one shot of kinky sex and a few dozen naked breasts. Flavour with a thrashy metal soundtrack. Colour with a garish, comic book–style palette. Cook it all up and you’ll get something resembling Demon Knight, the first of three feature-length horror flicks to be presented under the Tales from the Crypt banner. You’ll also have 90 minutes’ worth of twisted, haywire, mind-warping fun, with action and visual shocks aplenty.” – Steve Newton, Ear of Newt

Body Snatchers

658. (-2) Body Snatchers

Abel Ferrara

1993 / USA / 87m / Col / Science Fiction | IMDb
Terry Kinney, Meg Tilly, Gabrielle Anwar, Reilly Murphy, Billy Wirth, Christine Elise, R. Lee Ermey, Kathleen Doyle, Forest Whitaker, G. Elvis Phillips


“On the assumption that the audience already knows the premise, Body Snatchers doesn’t explain the alien invasion, it simply shows it with gloopily effective special effects. Ferrara, in a rare medium-budget excursion, shows he can make a smooth-looking, well paced film, while his acute ear for character tensions deftly captures the untidy human emotions that the pods live without. The writing and acting are way above average for a sci-fi quickie: note how a “truth” game between Anwar and soldier hero Billy Wirth sets up resonances that pay off throughout the film.” – Kim Newman, Empire Online

La novia ensangrentada

659. (-59) La novia ensangrentada

Vicente Aranda

1972 / Spain / 100m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Simón Andreu, Maribel Martín, Alexandra Bastedo, Dean Selmier, Ángel Lombarte, Montserrat Julió, Maria-Rosa Rodriguez


“Like DAUGHTERS OF DARKNESS and Jean Rollin’s erotic vampire thrillers of the same period, Vincent Aranda’s BLOOD SPATTERED BRIDE contains nudity and gore amidst the usual gothic European surroundings. However, this film does not wallow in endless softcore lesbian lovemaking scenes, but rather exploits the kinship between the two female antagonists with stylized class… Although sluggish in pacing, the film still succeeds and is a favorite amongst Euro horror buffs. Most of the meat is in the third act, but the discovery of the vampire Mircalla – buried in the beach sand, breathing through a snorkel and having her bare breasts dug out – is unforgettable.” – George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

Mute Witness

660. (+12) Mute Witness

Anthony Waller

1994 / Russia / 95m / Col / Thriller | IMDb
Marina Zudina, Fay Ripley, Evan Richards, Oleg Yankovskiy, Igor Volkov, Sergei Karlenkov, Alec Guinness, Aleksandr Pyatkov, Nikolai Pastukhov, Aleksandr Bureyev


“Mute Witness has a keen sense of geography, and the camera movement is choreographed against the positions of the actors to sustain a remarkable cinematic tension. Sudina has a keen sense of her character, too, playing Billy as determined but terrified, smart but vulnerable. Her performance, along with Waller’s sure, straightforward direction, render some of the script’s more obvious implausibilities irrelevant in favor of sharp audience identification with Billy. And when the veracity of what she saw is called into question — was the ‘murder’ she witnessed really just a clever special effect? — the audience, too, is forced to reconsider its own experience of the murder on screen.” – Bryant Frazer, Deep Focus

The Day of the Triffids

661. (+28) The Day of the Triffids

Steve Sekely

1962 / UK / 93m / Col / Science Fiction | IMDb
Howard Keel, Nicole Maurey, Janette Scott, Kieron Moore, Mervyn Johns, Ewan Roberts, Alison Leggatt, Geoffrey Matthews, Janina Faye, Gilgi Hauser


“The Day of the Triffids depicts a world-wide meteor storm, a train wreck, a plane crash, military bases aflame, vast metropolitan centers devoid of life (in scenes that seem to forecast images in films such as Day of the Dead [1985] and 28 Days Later [2002]) and also makes the threat of walking. man-eating plants palpable…and by the climax, totally believable. That’s no small accomplishment, and the sense you get watching this film is that everybody – from director and actors to the special effects artists – truly committed to the project. They stretched their miniscule budget as far as it could possibly go, deploying ingenuity to fill the gaps.” – John Kenneth Muir, Reflections on Cult Movies and Classic TV

La setta

662. (+76) La setta

Michele Soavi

1991 / Italy / 112m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Kelly Curtis, Herbert Lom, Mariangela Giordano, Michel Adatte, Carla Cassola, Angelika Maria Boeck, Giovanni Lombardo Radice, Niels Gullov, Tomas Arana


“As much as I usually champion self-indulgence, I have to say that The Sect’s high standing in Argento and Soavi’s oeuvre seems to have more to do with the restraint they show in all respects. As I mentioned, the oil painting-like visuals never take over and the cinematographic techniques aren’t just techniques; they’re storytelling aids. In the same vein, the Goblin-like score doesn’t sound like you accidentally left an early-70s Pink Floyd disc blasting on the stereo while you try to watch a movie-instead it’s understated and always perfect. The gore doesn’t seem intended only to earn a prominent placement in Fangoria-it always serves some other purpose. The surrealness isn’t an excuse for the lack of a coherent script. Etc. Best of all, perhaps, The Sect has the properties that many horror fans think define the genre-it’s creepy and scary.” – Brandt Sponseller, Classic-Horror

Night of the Lepus

663. (+18) Night of the Lepus

William F. Claxton

1972 / USA / 88m / Col / Nature | IMDb
Stuart Whitman, Janet Leigh, Rory Calhoun, DeForest Kelley, Paul Fix, Melanie Fullerton, Chris Morrell, Chuck Hayward, Henry Wills, Francesca Jarvis


“This dumb B-film mad scientist and monster movie has giant carnivorous bunny rabbits terrorize the state of Arizona. William F. Claxton (“Stage to Thunder Rock”) directs without realizing the bunnies are more cute than frightening… [it has] attained a legendary reputation as a genuine Golden Turkey. It’s an honor it richly deserves. Though, if not taken seriously, it’s well worth watching for those enamored by bad films that are unintentionally funny and try to give sincere lectures on subjects they don’t really have a feel for. In order words, I found it watchable for all the wrong reasons.” – Dennis Schwartz, Ozus’ World Movie Reviews

Mimic

664. (-56) Mimic

Guillermo del Toro

1997 / USA / 105m / Col / Science Fiction | IMDb
Mira Sorvino, Jeremy Northam, Alexander Goodwin, Giancarlo Giannini, Charles S. Dutton, Josh Brolin, Alix Koromzay, F. Murray Abraham, James Costa, Javon Barnwell


“Told in the darkly dreamy style of a particularly grim fairy tale, the creepy, beautifully designed Mimic embraces the clichs of the big-bug story-scientific hubris and the inevitable revenge of nature-and makes them seem, if not fresh, then certainly as robustly vital as the oversized vermin that stalk its pervasive shadows. Mimic also has an unusually high yuck factor, involving all manner of sticky, slippery, squishy things, but to call it a gross-out movie would be, well, grossly inaccurate. Making his U.S. debut, Mexican director Guillermo Del Toro (Cronos) rejects the adrenaline-charged, roller-coaster ride approach that drives so many recent thrillers in favor of constructing a densely imagined nightmare of damp streets and nightmare alleys.” – Maitland McDonagh, Film Journal

Castle Freak

665. (-25) Castle Freak

Stuart Gordon

1995 / USA / 90m / Col / Splatter | IMDb
Jeffrey Combs, Barbara Crampton, Jonathan Fuller, Jessica Dollarhide, Massimo Sarchielli, Elisabeth Kaza, Luca Zingaretti, Helen Stirling, Alessandro Sebastian Satta


“It’s a tight, taut little tale fraught with emotion and nail-biting terror. When things come to a head, it can only end in tragedy – though redemption is found as well. This, despite the corny name, is quite a powerful drama, with wonderful performances from Combs and Crampton. Jeff Combs, whose antihero drives the piece, really shines here and shows that he’s not just some over-the-top cult actor. The man is an accomplished and captivating performer.” – Dave Dunwoody, Oh, The Horror

Necronomicon

666. (-44) Necronomicon

Christophe Gans & Shûsuke Kaneko & Brian Yuzna

1993 / USA / 96m / Col / Anthology | IMDb
Jeffrey Combs, Tony Azito, Juan Fernández, Brian Yuzna, Bruce Payne, Belinda Bauer, Richard Lynch, Maria Ford, Peter Jasienski, Denice D. Lewis


“Anthologies must be difficult to create because there aren’t a lot of great ones out there. Necronomicon is a rare anthology that delivers the scares, gore, and Lovecraftian shenanigans in near-flawless fashion. It’s quite the accomplishment and one that I’m surprised isn’t placed on a similar pedestal as Re-animator and From Beyond. Brian Yuzna and Christophe Gans are such a perfect duo here with Shûsuke Kaneko completing the triad… In Necronomicon, the team have elevated the effectiveness of Lovecraft due to the fact that the short stories are given a chance to be just that; short.” – Matthew Caldwell, The Dark Spectrum

Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth

667. (+18) Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth

Anthony Hickox

1992 / USA / 97m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Kevin Bernhardt, Lawrence Mortorff, Terry Farrell, Ken Carpenter, Sharon Ceccatti, Paula Marshall, Robert C. Treveiler, Christopher Frederick, Lawrence Kuppin, Sharon Percival


“Pinhead is clearly the star of “Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth,” but unlike many cult horror heroes, he’s clearly in service to the devil of a plot. Though Clive Barker is merely the executive producer this go-round, writer Peter Atkins has remained faithful to Barker’s themes and there’s nothing here to violate the narrative logic established in the film’s predecessors… It’s hardly a surprise that Bradley steals the film — Atkins provides him with some great dialogue, to which the classically trained actor does justice… Genre fans will appreciate the blood flow and the gore, and director Anthony Hickox keeps things moving so that there’s never a dull moment — or dull blade. Consider Hell raised.” – Richard Harrington, Washington Post

Leprechaun

668. (-15) Leprechaun

Mark Jones

1993 / USA / 92m / Col / Comedy | IMDb
Warwick Davis, Jennifer Aniston, Ken Olandt, Mark Holton, Robert Hy Gorman, Shay Duffin, John Sanderford, John Voldstad, Pamela Mant, William Newman


“Davis was said to have wanted this role as a bad guy after coming off a career drought, with a lead role in Willow as “the good guy.” It’s without a doubt, that the Leprechaun franchise would have never even been conceived or enjoyed as much without Davis in the lead role. He carries the movies, and every scene without him is lacking severely because the cast cannot carry the film. I would call Leprechaun an example of pure nineties cheese and also a movie I’m sure Jennifer Anniston would like to erase from her resume… There is some mild gore, Davis owns the role and has a couple of shining moments. This is definitely not a movie I’d show to kids. That little bastard is creepy looking and could haunt a little child’s dreams.” – Richard Taylor, Severed Cinema

The Dentist

669. (-3) The Dentist

Brian Yuzna

1996 / USA / 92m / Col / Black Comedy | IMDb
Corbin Bernsen, Linda Hoffman, Michael Stadvec, Ken Foree, Tony Noakes, Molly Hagan, Patty Toy, Jan Hoag, Virginya Keehne, Earl Boen


“The film also has truly disturbing gore effects, the majority of which is a type that isn’t often seen in horror, mouth trauma. One of this film’s trademarks is a camera shot in which it appears the camera is inside the mouth looking at Feinstone’s work or is attached to the tool he’s using. You are right there, up close and personal, when he pulls a tooth, cuts the gums, cuts into the tongue, rips out teeth, or tries to rip a jaw open. Feinstone’s murderous mayhem, though, isn’t exclusive to oral injuries as he dispatches other people using such tactics as strangling, stabbing, and blunt force trauma to the head. The overall result is a series of truly grisly dental procedures and violent acts that are more than enough to put the viewer on edge.” – James Lasome, Best Horror Movies

The Devil's Advocate

670. (-13) The Devil’s Advocate

Taylor Hackford

1997 / USA / 144m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Keanu Reeves, Al Pacino, Charlize Theron, Jeffrey Jones, Judith Ivey, Connie Nielsen, Craig T. Nelson, Tamara Tunie, Ruben Santiago-Hudson, Debra Monk


“You don’t go into a movie called The Devil’s Advocate (Warner Bros.), starring Al Pacino and his gleaming teeth, expecting to see a finely calibrated portrait of evil. You go in expecting a brazenly hokey, in-your-face portrait of evil, and that, I’m happy to say, is just what you get. Directed by Taylor Hackford, The Devil’s Advocate is a schlock-religioso legal thriller — The Firm meets Angel Heart — and it’s at once silly, overwrought, and almost embarrassingly entertaining.” – Owen Gleiberman, Entertainment Weekly

Warlock

671. (+13) Warlock

Steve Miner

1989 / USA / 103m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Julian Sands, Lori Singer, Richard E. Grant, Mary Woronov, Kevin O’Brien, Richard Kuss, Allan Miller, Anna Levine, David Carpenter, Kay E. Kuter


“The moody opening scenes set in 1690s Massachusetts are expertly realised and the final showdown in the ancient gothic graveyard (complete with glittering Eighties cityscape matt-background) is the icing on the deliriously trashy cake. Had more subtlety been administered throughout the script this could have been a genuinely unsettling and formidably creepy affair. As it is though, it’s a wonderfully exuberant schlock-fest with some imaginative flair and a few great ideas, that can’t fail to raise a wry smile.” – James Gracey, Eye For Film

The Believers

672. (+30) The Believers

John Schlesinger

1987 / USA / 114m / Col / Thriller | IMDb
Martin Sheen, Helen Shaver, Harley Cross, Robert Loggia, Elizabeth Wilson, Harris Yulin, Lee Richardson, Richard Masur, Carla Pinza, Jimmy Smits


“In 1987 John Schlesinger directed this neo-noir horror film adapted from the 1982 novel The Religion by Nicholas Conde. The subject is voodoo, or more specifically the religion known as Santería, a mix of Roman Catholicism and Afro-Caribbean religious rituals and traditions. In an attempt to not disparage an entire religion, in the movie the real villains practice an offshoot called brujería, which is Spanish for witchcraft. At any rate, The Believers was criticized by some for perpetuating negative stereotypes. If you can look past that, however, this is a solidly entertaining thriller with a terrific cast led by Martin Sheen.” – Patrick Nash, Three Movie Buffs

J'accuse!

673. (-46) J’accuse!

Abel Gance

1938 / France / 104m / BW / War | IMDb
Victor Francen, Line Noro, Marie Lou, Jean-Max, Paul Amiot, Jean-Louis Barrault, Marcel Delaître, Renée Devillers, Romuald Joubé, André Nox


“This is a powerful film that leaves quite an impression. Gance told the French government that the film could be used as a recruiting tool, so they allowed him to film at the front (he captured part of the Battle of St. Mihiel) and the footage was used in the movie. He was also able to use soldiers on leave as extras in the climactic scene where the dead come back to life. Most of the men used in this scene were in the army and were tragically killed weeks later. Still, they had seen battle in the trenches of France and you can tell by the looks on their faces that they weren’t acting so much as reacting to what they had experienced.” – John Sinnott, DVD Talk

Paperhouse

674. (-44) Paperhouse

Bernard Rose

1988 / UK / 92m / Col / Fantasy | IMDb
Charlotte Burke, Jane Bertish, Samantha Cahill, Glenne Headly, Sarah Newbold, Gary Bleasdale, Elliott Spiers, Gemma Jones, Steven O’Donnell, Ben Cross


“The film doesn’t turn into a message movie, and this stuff can be ignored by a less perceptive viewer. Or it can be explained by the way that Anna’s loneliness manifests itself in her dreams. Her father is, at one point, introduced in her dream by a guitar stinger more suitable for a slasher movie. At first that seems like a dated misstep, until we consider how each image is part of Anna’s skewed viewpoint. Her world, encapsulated by this large, creepy, mostly empty house, in the middle of a spacious field, is the suggestion that she hasn’t lived long enough to fill in the details. As a film, Paperhouse is about Anna’s discovery of something she didn’t quite understand before- her own mortality. And she spends the entire film learning about it piece by piece.” – Adam Lippe, Examiner.com

Anatomie

675. (-8) Anatomie

Stefan Ruzowitzky

2000 / Germany / 103m / Col / Thriller | IMDb
Franka Potente, Benno Fürmann, Anna Loos, Sebastian Blomberg, Holger Speckhahn, Traugott Buhre, Oliver Wnuk, Arndt Schwering-Sohnrey, Andreas Günther


“Anatomy starts off great, with Potente’s arrival at the school interspersed with sequences involving soon-to-be-operated-on victims awaking in a sinister-looking metallic room. There’s also some good stuff with Potente’s classmates, and their relationships with each other. But after a fairly intriguing explanation for the odd method of medical research, the film essentially turns into another Scream-type flick – with Potente running around trying to escape a psycho killer. Still, Potente is good and the atmosphere is effectively creepy, so Anatomy just might be worth a look.” – David Nusair, Reel Film Reviews

Full Circle

676. (+28) Full Circle

Richard Loncraine

1977 / Canada / 98m / Col / Haunted House | IMDb
Mia Farrow, Keir Dullea, Tom Conti, Jill Bennett, Robin Gammell, Cathleen Nesbitt, Anna Wing, Edward Hardwicke, Mary Morris, Pauline Jameson


“A couple years ago, I laid out a subcategory of 70s horror called “Melancholy Horror,” describing it as “a sub-genre of especially artistic horror/thriller/supernatural drama films that fill half of you with genuine scares, and the rest with a genuine sadness– or at least a sense of overwhelming alienation… They always make the most of their budgets, however, and come across as very impressionistic, hypnotic, and dreamlike; the 1970s film stock often lending sunlight, candlelight, and fall colors a special ethereal prominence.” THE HAUNTING OF JULIA is no masterpiece: it’s not as good as DON’T LOOK NOW or THE CHANGELING or AUDREY ROSE, three films that it resembles thematically. But in Melancholy Horror, atmosphere often trumps narrative quality, and JULIA has atmosphere in spades” – Sean Gill, Junta Juleil’s Culture Shock

Frenzy

677. (0) Frenzy

Alfred Hitchcock

1972 / UK / 116m / Col / Slasher | IMDb
Jon Finch, Alec McCowen, Barry Foster, Billie Whitelaw, Anna Massey, Barbara Leigh-Hunt, Bernard Cribbins, Vivien Merchant, Michael Bates, Jean Marsh


“Frenzy is hardly a whodunit mystery. The audience discovers the identity of the true murderer within the first half hour of the film, so the focus turns to Blaney and the “wrong man” motif. Hitchcock wisely makes the antagonist the more likable of the two leading men though the serial killer story-line no longer has the punch it once enjoyed. The new freedom and increasing violence of filmmaking during the times allowed many filmmakers to indulge in much greater graphic storytelling. While many of Hitchcock’s films had themes of murder and diabolic evils, he employed a designed restraint that forced the viewer to use their imagination. A simple “less is more” philosophy.” – Terrence J. Brady, Teako 170

Vampyros Lesbos

678. (+34) Vampyros Lesbos

Jesús Franco

1971 / Germany / 89m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Soledad Miranda, Ewa Strömberg, Dennis Price, Heidrun Kussin, José Martínez Blanco, Andrés Monales, Paul Muller, Michael Berling, Jesús Franco


“A lot of Franco buffs consider Vampyros Lesbos to be a classic, and while it is certainly one of his most noteworthy and beautiful films, it falls far from being a traditional horror film. Franco’s appearance as saw-wielding nutjob with a penchant for tying up women and killing them is probably the most straightforward element that could drag Vampyros Lesbos kicking and screaming into the horror genre, while it really seems to want to be an arty lesbian fantasy with elements of gothic horror. Soledad Miranda gives Franco the kind of charismatic lead that is easy and subdued, so that the sexual vibes she gives off don’t have the tacky cheesiness of a typical domestic grindhouse title of the time. The moments between Miranda and Ewa Strömberg are beautifully staged, erotic and sensual without being smutty, amid most certainly not horrific. The convenient vampiric angle that Franco unfurls seems like a thin disguise for touting the free love rebellion against uptight sexual repression.” – Rich Rosell, Digitally Obsessed

The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires

679. (+26) The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires

Roy Ward Baker

1974 / UK / 83m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Peter Cushing, David Chiang, Julie Ege, Robin Stewart, Szu Shih, John Forbes-Robertson, Robert Hanna, Shen Chan, James Ma, Hui-Ling Liu


“By the early ‘70s, the beloved English horror and science-fiction studio Hammer was losing it. After about 15 years spent turning out distinctive, entertaining films made on modest budgets, the studio tried to stay relevant by resorting to desperate variations on classic horror themes… One of the more bizarre developments was Hammer’s decision to team up with Hong Kong’s Shaw Brothers, the production company behind numerous kung-fu hits… It’s pretty much as ridiculous as it sounds, but there’s something inherently entertaining about make-up-splattered vampires, distinguished British actors, and martial artists squaring off in periodic eruptions of kung-fu fighting.” – Keith Phipps, The Onion A.V. Club

The Return of Count Yorga

680. (new) The Return of Count Yorga

Bob Kelljan

1971 / USA / 97m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Robert Quarry, Mariette Hartley, Roger Perry, George Macready, Walter Brooke, Philip Frame, Yvonne Wilder, Tom Toner, Rudy De Luca, Edward Walsh


“The Return of Count Yorga isn’t really a sequel but a re-working of the original film on a higher budget and with better production values. It thus has a more polished look and a touch more wit… Whether The Return of Count Yorga is a better film than Count Yorga, Vampire really is a matter of personal taste. In my youth I do remember enjoying it more, for its slicker production values, for its small but memorable moments of humour, and for that Manson-like attack on the house, which stayed with me for some years and still plays every bit as well as I remember.” – Slarek, Cine Outsider

A Quiet Place

681. (new) A Quiet Place

John Krasinski

2018 / USA / 90m / Col / Monster | IMDb
Emily Blunt, John Krasinski, Millicent Simmonds, Noah Jupe, Cade Woodward, Leon Russom


“While it is mostly devoid of dialogue, it is a film rich in subtle textural detail. From the sand-strewn paths on which the family carefully tread to their simple white-light/red-light warning system, the visual tapestry of their everyday life is a constant reminder of how they cope with their predicament… despite its well-played jump scares, it operates at a deep emotional level. Aside from the fleeting appearance of an ill-fated elderly couple, there are no other human characters on screen; this apocalyptic tale is told entirely through the prism of a single family, one struggling to cope not only with actual monsters, but also with insidious personal demons of grief, blame and guilt.” – Nikki Baughan, Sight & Sound

Oculus

682. (+174) Oculus

Mike Flanagan

2013 / USA / 104m / Col / Supernatural | IMDb
Karen Gillan, Brenton Thwaites, Katee Sackhoff, Rory Cochrane, Annalise Basso, Garrett Ryan, James Lafferty, Miguel Sandoval, Kate Siegel, Scott Graham


“In many ways, Oculus feels like the best J-horror remake not based on an existing film (apart from being based on Flanagan’s own short films). There’s a pervasive sense of tragedy throughout, as the details of Kaylie and Tim’s tragic past are slowly fed to us through flashbacks and hallucinations, calling to mind the disorientation of The Grudge and the mournful quality of Dark Water… Flanagan delivers plenty of horrible little shocks courtesy of the mirror’s ability to delude and misdirect, with a couple of moments that will have you putting your hands over your eyes, but Oculus is refreshingly light on cheap jump scares… By rooting its clever narrative structure in a tragic story, Flanagan has created a horror that pulls on the heartstrings as often as it grabs you by the throat, helped every step of the way by an excellent cast.” – Jonathan Hatfull, SciFiNow

Lake Mungo

683. (+53) Lake Mungo

Joel Anderson

2008 / Australia / 87m / Col / Found Footage | IMDb
Rosie Traynor, David Pledger, Martin Sharpe, Talia Zucker, Tania Lentini, Cameron Strachan, Judith Roberts, Robin Cuming, Marcus Costello, Chloe Armstrong


“Anderson’s use of the documentary framework is an inspired choice, since it lends what we’re seeing an air of reality that helps build the tension to jangling point. It also gives him the opportunity to vary the look with the use of different types of film, including Super 8 and lots of still photography, smartly serving the story while keeping a grip on what was, presumably, a very tight budget. By staying true to the audience’s expectations of the documentary format, the sense of dread that settles over the family is also more readily conveyed than it might have been if we were watching something which looked more ‘fictional’. It’s not just the format that draws the viewer in, but also the manner in which the film is shot. Since much of what the family talk about relates to spooky images in pictures, Anderson’s camerawork draws you deeper and deeper into the frame with an increasing feeling of unease.” – Amber Wilkinson, Eye For Film

What We Do in the Shadows

684. (+179) What We Do in the Shadows

Jemaine Clement & Taika Waititi

2014 / New Zealand / 86m / Col / Vampire | IMDb
Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi, Jonathan Brugh, Cori Gonzalez-Macuer, Stuart Rutherford, Ben Fransham, Rhys Darby, Jackie van Beek, Elena Stejko, Jason Hoyte


“Fans of Clement and Waititi’s previous work know the kind of humour to expect: bone-dry, beautifully observed and deeply silly. There’s a brilliantly funny sequence in which the three speaking vamps furiously debate the washing up rota, the importance of virgin blood is floridly discussed, while a dinner party sequence in which potential victims are confronted with re-enacted Lost Boys sequences is beautifully done… Clement in particular is clearly having a brilliant time, as it soon becomes apparent that the lascivious Vlad’s best years are behind him, while Waititi slays with his portrayal of the sweetly heartbroken Viago. In short, the most important thing to know about What We Do In The Shadows is that it’s laugh-out-loud hilarious” – Jonathan Hatfull, SciFiNow

Berberian Sound Studio

685. (+92) Berberian Sound Studio

Peter Strickland

2012 / UK / 92m / Col / Psychological | IMDb
Toby Jones, Cosimo Fusco, Antonio Mancino, Fatma Mohamed, Salvatore LI Causi, Chiara D’Anna, Tonia Sotiropoulou, Eugenia Caruso, Susanna Cappellaro, Guido Adorni


“Berberian Sound Studio has something of early Lynch and Polanski, and the nasty, secretive studio is a little like the tortured Mark Lewis’s screening room in Powell’s Peeping Tom, but that gives no real idea of how boldly individual this film is. In fact, it takes more inspiration from the world of electronic and synth creations and the heyday of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, and it is close in spirit to Kafka’s The Castle or to the Gothic literary tradition of Bram Stoker and Ann Radcliffe: a world of English innocents abroad in a sensual, mysterious landscape… With a face suggesting cherubic innocence, vulnerability and cruelty, Toby Jones gives the performance of his career, and Peter Strickland has emerged as a key British film-maker of his generation.” – Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

Maniac

686. (+49) Maniac

Franck Khalfoun

2012 / USA / 89m / Col / Slasher | IMDb
Nora Arnezeder, Brian Ames, America Olivo, Genevieve Alexandra, Liane Balaban, Jan Broberg, Aaron Colom, Joshua Delagarza, Alex Diaz, Megan Duffy


“With the accomplished Maxime Alexandre serving as cinematographer, and Raphael Hamburger providing a euro-trashy synth score, Maniac proves exploitative horror flicks need not seem hastily slapped together to unsettle and disturb. Maniac is technically impressive, which is more than can be said for most schlock of its ilk. If you’re watching Maniac to admire cinematic handiwork, to ponder our culpability in slasher flicks, or to compare Wood’s performance with the original’s Joe Spinell, I can safely recommend it.” – Simon Miraudo, Quickflix

Piranha

687. (-45) Piranha

Alexandre Aja

2010 / USA / 88m / Col / Nature | IMDb
Richard Dreyfuss, Ving Rhames, Elisabeth Shue, Christopher Lloyd, Eli Roth, Jerry O’Connell, Steven R. McQueen, Jessica Szohr, Kelly Brook, Riley Steele


“Sometimes a title can tell you everything you need to know. Such is the case with Piranha 3D, a film in which prehistoric piranhas fly out of the screen at your face. If that sounds like a good time at the movies then run to the cinema immediately. Filled with recognisable faces, packed with excessive blood and gore and jokes as corny as they are hilarious, Piranha 3D is, if nothing else, the most honest and unpretentious piece of filmmaking of 2010… Aja has found a wonderful mix of horror and laughs and even manages some scenes of tension that’ll have you gripping your armrest. Piranha 3D is a pure, unadulterated fun.” – Glenn Dunks, Trespass Magazine

Amer

688. (-6) Amer

Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani

2009 / Belgium / 90m / Col / Psychological | IMDb
Cassandra Forêt, Charlotte Eugène Guibeaud, Marie Bos, Bianca Maria D’Amato, Harry Cleven, Jean-Michel Vovk, Bernard Marbaix, Thomas Bonzani, François Cognard, Delphine Brual


“This is basic movie Freud, elegantly mounted. The soundtrack (footsteps, dripping taps, creaking doors, banging shutters) is ominously exaggerated. The close-ups are extreme. Colours change melodramatically to fit the shifting moods. The music is borrowed from old horror films. The dialogue is at first sparse, then non-existent. Luis Buñuel (sliced eyeballs, insects crawling out of bodies), Mario Bava and Dario Argento are affectionately alluded to. Viewers are left to create their own narratives or absorb the events into their own dreams and nightmares. This is art-house horror, a pure cinema for connoisseurs, a return to late-19th-century decadence.” – Philip French, The Guardian

The Innkeepers

689. (+96) The Innkeepers

Ti West

2011 / USA / 101m / Col / Haunted House | IMDb
Sara Paxton, Pat Healy, Alison Bartlett, Jake Ryan, Kelly McGillis, Lena Dunham, Brenda Cooney, George Riddle, John Speredakos, Sean Reid


“The suspense built up in this story is real. I wasn’t on the edge of my seat but there was a knot in my stomach as I wondered what was going to happen next. From a creepy basement visit with the ghost to a scene where the aging actress warns Claire about the spirit world, this movie is slow but tantalizing. “I’m just here for one last bit of nostalgia,” the hotel’s final visitor says, a nod to why the film works so well. It’s a nostalgic film that should remind viewers of what suspense really feels like. Suspense isn’t watching a man getting hacked into pieces. It’s watching a woman realize that she’s in too deep when she starts asking too many questions about paranormal activity. And that what “The Innkeepers” delivers.” – John Hanlon, Big Hollywood

Don't Breathe

690. (+216) Don’t Breathe

Fede Alvarez

2016 / USA / 88m / Col / Home Invasion | IMDb
Stephen Lang, Jane Levy, Dylan Minnette, Daniel Zovatto, Emma Bercovici, Franciska Töröcsik, Christian Zagia, Katia Bokor, Sergej Onopko, Olivia Gillies


“The key highlight of director Fede Alvarez’s movie is innovation. There’s a segment in the movie shot in pitch darkness with grey night vision and that has the potential to be the most frightening 10 minutes of your life. Even the build up on the sequence where the gang breaks in to the house at night is just nerve-wracking. You can easily compare Don’t Breathe to thriller horror classics like Psycho, Old Boy and Vertigo. The tension here is so authentic and gripping this film can impress even those with nerves of steel. Forget those CGI-driven ghost soap operas that pretend to be horror movies. This film, its dark basement environments and its superlative camera and sound work is like a real life nightmare unfolding on the big screen.” – Rachit Gupta, Filmfare

The Woman in Black

691. (-54) The Woman in Black

James Watkins

2012 / UK / 95m / Col / Haunted House | IMDb
Emma Shorey, Molly Harmon, Ellisa Walker-Reid, Sophie Stuckey, Daniel Radcliffe, Misha Handley, Jessica Raine, Roger Allam, Lucy May Barker, Indira Ainger


“Director James Watkins expertly uses shadows and empty spaces to create a percolating sense of dread, and he waits until the last possible moment before allowing his audience the catharsis of a shock… there’s barely a glimpse of anything scary in this film, but that’s precisely what makes it so terrifying. Neither the 1989 televised adaptation nor the enduringly popular stage play are entirely faithful to Hill’s novel, and this latest version takes the plot down some cobweb-strewn corridors of its own, but its marriage of gothic fiction and gothic fashion feels entirely right for our times. Like all of the best ghost stories, The Woman In Black is only enriched in the retelling.” – Robbie Collin, Daily Telegraph

Grindhouse

692. (-49) Grindhouse

Robert Rodriguez & Quentin Tarantino et al.

2007 / USA / 191m / Col / Anthology | IMDb
Kurt Russell, Zoë Bell, Rosario Dawson, Vanessa Ferlito, Sydney Tamiia Poitier, Tracie Thoms, Rose McGowan, Jordan Ladd, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Quentin Tarantino


“An exuberant double feature by Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino, evokes the exploitation flicks that used to play, several decades ago, in moldering theaters with flypaper floors. Thus a go-go dancer’s leg goes missing during a zombie attack, and the action is occasionally interrupted by title cards that proclaim “Missing Reel.” (That touch is more affectionate than factual, since projectionists and sleazy distributors of the slasher/horror genre didn’t brag about such omissions.) Little else seems to be missing from this work of wild-eyed archaeology – not the slime or drool, spurting blood, throbbing engines, screeching tires or jeopardized women. Yet value has been added as well – the most thrilling car chase ever committed to film, a sequence that also shows, by cutting to the psychosexual chase, why fans embraced the tawdry genre in the first place.” – Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal

The Human Centipede (First Sequence)

693. (+88) The Human Centipede (First Sequence)

Tom Six

2009 / Netherlands / 92m / BW / Body Horror | IMDb
Dieter Laser, Ashley C. Williams, Ashlynn Yennie, Akihiro Kitamura, Andreas Leupold, Peter Blankenstein, Bernd Kostrau, Rene de Wit, Sylvia Zidek, Rosemary Annabella


“So what is the use of a genre film that doesn’t conform to the conventions of genre? Plenty. You know this movie is called The Human Centipede. You will watch the film knowing you will see a human centipede. And when it is over, you will be able to claim you have now seen a human centipede. The evocative title, the lack of motive and the absence of genre tropes are completely intentional – Six is giving us what we want, reminding us all the while that getting exactly what we want is usually the last thing we should ever really have. Basically, The Human Centipede is a better, more effective satire (experiment?) than Michael Haneke’s Funny Games.” – Simon Miraudo, Quikflix

The Signal

694. (+40) The Signal

David Bruckner & Dan Bush & Jacob Gentry

2007 / USA / 103m / Col / Science Fiction | IMDb
Anessa Ramsey, Sahr Ngaujah, AJ Bowen, Matthew Stanton, Suehyla El-Attar, Justin Welborn, Cheri Christian, Scott Poythress, Christopher Thomas, Lindsey Garrett


“An outright horror film that nonetheless veers on occasion into surreal black comedy, The Signal… takes Marshall McLuhan’s famous statement “the medium is the message” to extremes not explored since David Cronenberg’s seminal, frighteningly prescient Videodrome in 1983… The Signal is a shuddery critique of the ultrapervasive influence of big (and little) media on humanity and the paranoia engendered by its sheer invasiveness. It’s also a snarky stab at the desensitizing aspects of everything… Both apocalyptic and suitably vague, The Signal’s only serious weakness comes from some borderline histrionic performances; then again, it’s tough to call hysteria anything other than a sane response to a world gone mad.” – Marc Savlov, Austin Chronicle

Srpski film

695. (+50) Srpski film

Srdjan Spasojevic

2010 / Serbia / 104m / Col / Exploitation | IMDb
Srdjan Todorovic, Sergej Trifunovic, Jelena Gavrilovic, Slobodan Bestic, Katarina Zutic, Luka Mijatovic, Ana Sakic, Lena Bogdanovic, Miodrag Krcmarik, Nenad Herakovic


“The escalating incidents of pedophilia, incest, and necrophilia that follow reflect a country traumatized by otherwise unspeakable acts of violence committed under the auspices of war. We witness the disgusting underbelly of a broken civilization where human values no longer exist. There are no degrees of separation from a communal psychosis that affects every citizen. By putting the narrative in a psycho-sexual-cinematic context Spasojević invites the viewer to compare his made-up pornography of death to the similar underlying nature of capitalism’s commercial cinema of the West and its attendant sponsors. In order to see the message of Srđan Spasojević daring work of filmic art you need only consider the capitalist aspect that makes it possible.” – Cole Smithey

The Wolfman

696. (-51) The Wolfman

Joe Johnston

2010 / USA / 103m / Col / Werewolf | IMDb
Simon Merrells, Gemma Whelan, Emily Blunt, Benicio Del Toro, Mario Marin-Borquez, Asa Butterfield, Cristina Contes, Anthony Hopkins, Art Malik, Malcolm Scates


“Universal’s update of one its iconic monster properties, like most of director Joe Johnston’s work, solidly gets the job done as a brisk, bloody entertainment… if this film perhaps strongly recalls another, it’s Tim Burton’s 1999 take on Sleepy Hollow, what with its touches of macabre humor and giddy torrents of bloodshed… For all the gore, though, this doesn’t quite qualify as horror, for the film is never really scary and maybe fleetingly creepy, but then atmosphere has never really been Johnston’s strong suit; what has always been, however, is staging exciting set pieces, and the action sequences deliver.” – Michael Dequina, TheMovieReport

Baby Blood

697. (+47) Baby Blood

Alain Robak

1990 / France / 82m / Col / Splatter | IMDb
Emmanuelle Escourrou, Christian Sinniger, Jean-François Gallotte, Roselyne Geslot, François Frappier, Thierry Le Portier, Rémy Roubakha, Eric Averlant, Alain Robak


“Although it is frequently found lacking in the depth department, BABY BLOOD makes up for its shallow storytelling with plenty of outrageous gore and sadistic black humor. Alain Robak is far more concerned with the film’s intense visual style and moody atmosphere than in trying to explain the origins behind the parasite and its host. The creature’s internal dialog creates a number of entertaining moments as Yanka reacts with sudden outbursts of laughter and rage. Robak’s kinetic camera work follows Yanka’s knife as she buries in to her victims at ramming speed, producing absurd amounts of blood that drench the entire set in the process.” – Carl Manes, I Like Horror Movies

Irréversible

698. (-70) Irréversible

Gaspar Noé

2002 / France / 97m / Col / Drama | IMDb
Monica Bellucci, Vincent Cassel, Albert Dupontel, Jo Prestia, Philippe Nahon, Stéphane Drouot, Jean-Louis Costes, Michel Gondoin, Mourad Khima, Hellal


“What we have here is a genuine outlaw work of art. They are to be treasured. From Louis-Ferdinand Celine’s twisted tales of the perverse in ’30s Paris to Henry Miller’s examination of the extremes of heterosex and John Rechy’s of the extremes of homosex, and Jim Thompson’s bleak, nihilistic noir fables, to Sam Peckinpah’s blood-spattered Götterdämmerungs, they are tough to sit through and impossible to forget. They get way deep inside, to the reptile walnut of brain still in the center of the head…. it seems to be Noe’s first philosophical position, that natural man is a monster.” – Stephen Hunter, Washington Post

Nattevagten

699. (+9) Nattevagten

Ole Bornedal

1994 / Denmark / 107m / Col / Thriller | IMDb
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Sofie Gråbøl, Kim Bodnia, Lotte Andersen, Ulf Pilgaard, Rikke Louise Andersson, Stig Hoffmeyer, Gyrd Løfquist, Niels Anders Thorn, Leif Adolfsson


“Tightly scripted, with just a drop of wicked black humour, the film delivers creepy hints of necrophilia, visceral shocks and heart-racing suspense. The one unconvincing note is the parallel between these murderous events and rehearsals for an amateur theatrical production of Mephisto. Otherwise, this is the kind of superior genre movie-making where the eerie fluttering of moths in a glass lampshade is as chilling as the screaming, hysterical violence that follows.” – Time Out

Screamers

700. (+6) Screamers

Christian Duguay

1995 / Canada / 108m / Col / Science Fiction | IMDb
Peter Weller, Roy Dupuis, Jennifer Rubin, Andrew Lauer, Charles Edwin Powell, Ron White, Michael Caloz, Liliana Komorowska, Jason Cavalier, Leni Parker


Screamers has an interesting, multi-layered plot, with lots of twists and turns… Overall, the film shows us a great vision of a futuristic dystopia, where big corporations travel the solar system in search of resources and riches. The deceit and betrayal suffered by our protagonist provide a sense of despair and isolation. And the Screamers add threat, uncertainty and fear. All of these elements combine to make this an intriguing film about one man’s fight for survival when all hope seems lost.” – Emma Hutchings, Suspend Your Disbelief